Brussels Writer Counts His Chickens

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Upcoming Events

Brussels Summer Festival 2014

Since 2002, more than 1000 artists have taken part in the Brussels Summer Festival, ten days of music from local and international artists in the heart of the city. This year's line-up includes performances from Patti Smith, Catfish, Mumbai Silence, Rey Cabrera, Clare Louise, Guilt Monkey, Leaf House and Eddie & the Hot Rods, plus many more. Concerts will be held in three locations: Place des Palais, Mont des Arts and Magic Mirrors (Place des Musées). Presale tickets are available through 7 August, or tickets can be purchased at the door. A 10-day pass can be purchased during presale for €50, plus ticketing fees; one-day and two-day passes are available as well. Discounted access to select museums and events is extended to those who purchase a 10-day pass, thanks to partnerships with a number of cultural institutions throughout the city. More information about the Brussels Summer Festival 2014 can be found at www.bsf.be.

PHOTO: Eric Danhier


Friday, 8 August, 2014 - 18:00 - Sunday, 17 August, 2014 - 22:00 Place des Palais, Mont des Arts, Magic Mirrors (Place des Musées) / Brussels upcoming events,

Feeërieën 2014

The Feeërieën festival is the AB’s annual free music offering from around the world. Performers include Perfume Genius, Douglas Dare, Antony & the Johnsons, Miaux, Lonnie Holley, Jessy Lanza Copeland and Killing Sound.

AB’s Kevin McMullan says: “The Feeërieën is an annual festival of what we call ‘outdoor cocooning’. Five nights of free concerts in an intimate magical context in which you’re bound to make some musical discoveries.”

www.abconcerts.be

Monday, 25 August, 2014 - 20:00 - Friday, 29 August, 2014 - 23:00 Warandepark / Brussels upcoming events,

Beck

Beck’s back at Forest National, with his superb new album Morning Phase. Reports from his first concerts in the states are very promising. 10 September. Doors open at 19:00; the show will start at 20:00. Tickets: €46 - www.livenation.be

Wednesday, 10 September, 2014 - 20:00 - 22:00 Forest National / Brussels upcoming events,

Pa Weathery’s Chickens by the author, editor and screenwriter Paul Morris is one of the most extraordinary books you’re likely to read in a long time.

We are quickly introduced to SimRarg, a "traveler" of as-yet indeterminate origin, who finds himself in a “body  . . . that was not half bad, male, medium height, around twenty-five, handsome enough, fit enough; he would do”, sent by ‘the Engineers’ to Texas, he is tasked with a mission that even he does not understand, one that will change the world forever. November 22 1963, Dallas, 12.32pm. Ring any bells?

Anyway, he has to get the eponymous Pa Weathery onside first, and his slutty siren of a daughter, and, well, his chickens too . . . “You can sleep in the barn but if you so much as lay a finger on my daughter or my chickens, it’s your neck I’ll wring.” And there’s just one more little problem, SimRarg is black. Truly, a stranger in a strange land.

It took me a while to determine exactly what cultural buttons Morris’ yarn pushed, then I realized, while I have always been very interested in JFK conspiracy theories, it is (unwittingly?) the old ATV sci-fi series Sapphire and Steel, starring Joanna Lumley and David McCallum, that Pa Weathery’s seems to take its cue from most, with its titular ‘time detectives’ from another dimension, who are not quite alien but very much more than human, sent to safeguard the structure of time.

SimRarg never seems to be sure exactly what he may or may not be safeguarding, but one thing’s for sure, orders are orders.

This is riveting stuff, Stephen King will be publishing his take on the Kennedy assassination later this year, 22.11.63, but Morris got there first and, as far as bone-dry, believable dialogue, fascinating characterizations and a rattling good yarn is concerned, King is going to have to go some to top this.

Perhaps Morris’s finest achievement with this, his first novel, is the ease with which he seamlessly blends startling sci-fi with unflinching social commentary, as he casts a cold eye over the racism and corruption of early 1960s America. And, as for the novel’s take on the “conspiracy” itself goes, ask yourself , how much more incredible is what happens here than what the US public of the time were asked to believe happened? “Mr. President, you can’t say that Dallas doesn’t love you  . . .”

Besides, sources close to this reviewer reveal that sequels are afoot and, really, it couldn’t be any other way, just wait until you find out where our man is heading next, and who his next target is. And why? Well, that would be telling.

There is perhaps the occasional sense that Morris has grown too fond of wrapping the reader up in riddles, and his love of metaphor runs maybe a little too deep, but this is nevertheless a startling debut from an author we can expect a great deal more from. Bring it on, say I.


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